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Video: The Kingsmead Eyes photography exhibition at the Museum of Childhood | Life and style | guardian.co.uk

Video: The Kingsmead Eyes photography exhibition at the Museum of Childhood | Life and style | guardian.co.uk.

October 3, 2010 Posted by | art, Britain, children, culture, global, greetings, social | | Leave a comment

Whisper of the Wind, by Dave Brosha Highly commended The Aurora Borealis, in…

Whisper of the Wind, by Dave Brosha Highly commended The Aurora Borealis, in….

September 12, 2010 Posted by | art | | Leave a comment

Nurse being kissed in iconic wartime picture dies, aged 91 | World news | The Guardian

Edith Shain is kissed by an American sailor while thousands jam Times Square, New York, to celebrate victory over Japan in 1945. Photograph: Alfred Eisenstaedt/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
A nurse who was photographed being kissed in Times Square in New York to celebrate the end of the second world war in 1945 has died, aged 91.

The iconic VJ Day picture of Edith Shain by Alfred Eisenstaedt was published in Life magazine.

The identity of the nurse in the photograph was not known until the late 1970s when Shain wrote to Eisenstaedt to say that she was the woman in the picture. It was taken on 14 August 1945 when she had been working at Doctor’s Hospital in New York.

Posted via email from YESTERDAYS and TOMORROWS

June 23, 2010 Posted by | history, photography, war | | Leave a comment

Canterbury Cathedral

As the photo above of Canterbury Cathedral shows, cathedrals were huge buildings – they were major long term building projects and their cost was huge.
Medieval Cathedrals were the most obvious sign of the wealth of the church in Medieval England. Huge cathedrals were found principally at Canterbury and York, and in major cities such as Lincoln, Worcester, and Chichester. The cost of these buildings was vast – but the money to pay for these huge buildings came from the people via the many payments they had to make to the Roman Catholic Church. 
How were such huge buildings built? Medieval workers worked with the most basic of tools and in conditions that modern day health and safety laws would forbid. But for all this, the most common driving force was to build a magnificent building for the greater glory of God.
The most obvious starting point was for an architect to be found who would design a cathedral. An architect would also know who were the best master craftsmen to employ – and many highly skilled men were needed.

June 21, 2010 Posted by | cathedral, London | | Leave a comment