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Great Works: Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1524), Parmigianino – Great Works, Art – The Independent

Parmigianino
Image via Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

Since Brunelleschi created linear perspective early in the 15th century, thousands of painters have created the illusion of credible three-dimensional worlds into which we have all been invited to step. Some painters have found that depth of illusionism too shallow a challenge. They have wanted to persuade us that there are super-subtle tricks of painterly effect which make mere three-dimensional illusionism seem as easy as winking by comparison.

 

 

 

The Mannerist painter Parmigianino painted his Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror in 1524 when he was 21 years of age – in fact, he may have been slightly younger. It was thought by the great 16th-century biographer Vasari in the first version of his life of the painter, written about 30 years after Parmigianino’s death, that it may have been painted as a gift for Pope Clement VII. Parmigianano made it, quite deliberately, as a bravura performance, to prove, at a stroke, his own brilliance, and Vasari duly waxed lyrical about its extraordinary qualities. This was not the only time that Parmigianio was to paint or to draw his own features. Like Rembrandt, he found his own image utterly absorbing. Unlike Rembrandt, however, Parmigianino died young – at the age of 37 – and so he was not able to chart the fascinating subject of the ageing of human flesh.

 

 

via Great Works: Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1524), Parmigianino – Great Works, Art – The Independent.

 

via Great Works: Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1524), Parmigianino – Great Works, Art – The Independent.

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October 16, 2010 - Posted by | art, culture, history, middle ages, social | , , , , ,

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